Digital Literacy

Defining Digital Literacies

October 16, 2019, 4:00pm

Models of digital literacies emphasize the importance of critical consumption and creation of content as a part of one’s digital identity and wellbeing. How do we facilitate students’ active engagement online as responsible digital citizens? How do we encourage the skillsets and mindsets that make up digital literacies in a classroom setting? How do we define digital literacies?

We will look at several models (Virginia Tech, Jisc, and New Media Consortium) in order to better understand and define digital literacies and discuss how we can develop them in teaching and learning.

Registration is unavailable.

Visual Literacy: Learning to Look // Looking to Learn

September 26, 2019, 4:00pm

Visual literacy emcompasses analyzing, interpreting, creating, and sharing images. An important component of visual literacy is understanding how to assess images that are found and used in the research process. How do we teach students to look critically? How do we support students as they experiment with visual content in their own research? How do we evaluate projects that incorporate graphics and images?

Registration is unavailable.

2019 Teaching and Research Resource Fair

April 18, 2019, 11:00am
Join us for our third annual AIS-palooza! Connect with service providers and academic support units from across campus to get your question answered, find inspiration, and learn about new ideas.
Registration is unavailable.

Teaching Dialogues

Teaching Dialogues are a regular series of campus-wide discussions on pressing topics related to teaching and learning, hosted by the Center for Teaching and Learning and the Academic Senate's Committee on Teaching.

Algorithmic Bias in Search and Research

April 18, 2018, 4:00pm
Algorithms shape our everyday access to information, defining what we can and can not find online. Safiya Umoja Noble's (USC) forthcoming book Algorithms of Oppression explores the algorithms that form the backbone for services like Google and Facebook, and the ways in which these algorithms reinforce racist views and encode gender discrimination. As commercial platforms increasingly control how scholars, as well as the general public, access information, it's critical for our students to consider the ways in which these tools are anything but neutral.
Registration is unavailable.

2018 Teaching and Research Resource Fair

April 12, 2018, 11:00am
Join us for our second annual AIS-palooza. Connect with service providers and academic support units from across campus to learn about resources that are available to all UCB instructors and researchers. Schedule a consultation to improve your teaching, learn about exciting new tools to engage students and speed grading, secure your research data, create more inclusive classrooms, and more.
Registration is unavailable.

Immersive Education: Teaching With and About VR/AR

April 19, 2018, 3:00pm
As newer technologies such as virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) gain in popularity, how are they impacting teaching and learning in the classroom? What does it mean to teach with rather than just about VR and AR? Where and in what ways is VR/AR showing up on campus? This event is intended as an introduction to VR/AR and other immersive technologies on campus and in the classroom. All are welcome and no prior knowledge is required!
Registration is unavailable.

Assignment Showcase: Designing for Discovery

December 6, 2018, 12:00pm
Join us for lightning talks and lunch, featuring instructors presenting assignments they have developed that foster inquiry and engagement with primary sources.
Registration is unavailable.

Adobe Fellows Meeting

December 5, 2018, 12:00pm
End-of-semester check-in meeting for American Cultures instructors participating in the Adobe Fellows Program. During this meeting, we will share assignment plans, gather feedback, and develop implementation plans.
Registration is not required.

Challenging Privilege: Genre, Sources, and the Writer’s Voice

October 23, 2018, 4:00pm
Whose knowledge do we privilege when we introduce our students to writing and research practices in the Berkeley classroom? How can we use discussions about voice, audience, authority, and “scholarly sources” to critically consider the range of knowledge practices privileged in higher education? And, how can students develop authentic and professional voices that will serve them well across a variety of writing contexts?
Registration is unavailable.